Cartier Icons: A Short History On The Juste un Clou

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches

IMAGE: CARTIER

If you’ve been an avid reader of Bagaholicboy, Cartier’s iconic Juste un Clouwould be no stranger to you. Thing is, do you know how the humble nail became one of the French luxury house’s signature pieces of jewellery? Well, read on to find out.

IMAGE: CARTIER

The man who designed Cartier’s LOVE also designed the Juste un Clou, and he was Aldo Cipullo, a jewellery designer who joined the company in 1969. Professing a love for all things bolts, nuts and screws (he even said once the hardware store was his second home), the Juste un Clou was created 3 years later in 1971 and inspired by the humble nail. But in the hands of Aldo Cipullo, the most common of hardware essentials was masterfully turned into something that was (and still is) equal parts desirable and irresistible.

IMAGE: CARTIER

Cool, edgy and sexy, the Juste un Clou became one of the standout icons of the 1970s, all thanks to Cipullo who had pioneered a new trend in fashion for precious jewellery inspired by modern machines and their parts. The beauty of the Juste un Clou ultimately lies in its wearability; you can wear it with almost anything dressed up or down as you pleased.

IMAGE: CARTIER

It is also a piece of jewellery that men can pull off, being a piece that’s chunky and sizeable in all the right places. Great for him, and for her, that’s true versatility, and coupled with the fact that it has transcended trends and time, the Juste un Clou is an icon in its own right, and deservedly so.

Tags: Cartier

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Parmigiani Fleurier Bugatti Aérolithe Performance

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches

The Bugatti Aérolithe Performance is the newest timepiece made and developed by Swiss luxury watchmaker Parmigiani Fleurier to continue its relationship with the French hypercar-maker. It was back in 2001 when the first meeting between Parmigiani Fleurier and Bugatti took place, and the two brands formally entered into a partnership in 2004. Bugatti gave Parmigiani Fleurier carte blanche to craft some of the most exclusive creations, using sophisticated materials often unseen in the automotive industry and on a scale that fills the car manufacturer with admiration; and the Bugatti collection, inspired by the spirit of the Molsheim-based brand, was born.



The collection began with the Bugatti Type 370, which set the benchmark for the future models. Since then, several timepieces have been introduced as a part of the Bugatti collection along with the Parmigiani Bugatti Aérolithe Chronograph, which was released in 2014 and inspired by the legendary 1935 Bugatti Type 57 Aérolithe. The Fleurier-based watchmaker’s newest timepiece also pays tribute to the same automotive masterpiece; but is a more refined, super-exclusive watch you would expect to come out of the partnership between the two high-end brands. This model focuses on the rich and textured dial created by techniques only achievable through use of laser technology.

Even by Bugatti standards, the 1935 Type 57 Aerolithe was no ordinary car. Built a few years before the infamous type 57SC Atlantics, the story of the Bugatti Aérolithe is an almost legend. Jean Bugatti built the Bugatti Aérolithe, hidden from his father Ettore, by creating it from a highly flammable magnesium alloy called ‘Elektron’ that made welding impossible. The body was designed in two parts joined by an ingenious riveted dorsal seam. The Aérolithe made a sensational debut at the 1935 Earl’s Court Motor Show in the U.K. and had one road test in 1936. But soon after, the incredible car disappeared from the surface of the earth. The car was never seen again; it was most likely destroyed.

When creating the Bugatti Aérolithe Performance, Parmigiani Fleurier was inspired by the legendary prototype’s beauty and mystery. Instead of the extremely flammable magnesium alloy used in the car, the 41mm case of the watch is made entirely from titanium, using laser technology to apply finishes beyond the capability of conventional machining. The dial has a diamond-shaped, textured pattern in which the ends of the diamonds are polished in order to create a richer, textured look. Parmigiani Fleurier says that it is impossible to achieve it without the use of said laser technology. Even the exterior of the dial is ‘selectively laser sand blasted’ to add to the aesthetic appeal of the timepiece.

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Would You Wear... a Beaded Choker?

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches

Product Information: Free People, Forever 21, Urban OutfittersProduct Information: Free People, Forever 21, Urban Outfitters

Slap bands, Now and Then, jelly shoes, and Lip Smackers are some of our favorite things from the '90s. They may not all be coming back into style (yet), but one trademark stamp of 1990s fashion is having a major resurgence: the beaded choker.

Ribbon chokers and high-neck clothes have been making their way back to popularity, but finally the beaded choker has arrived. We can't help loving this one (and wanting to wear it while watching Romy and Michele's High School Reunion).

Product Information: Nasty Gal, Topshop, BaubleBarProduct Information: Nasty Gal, Topshop, BaubleBar

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Eddera Headbands: Crowned with Laurels

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches


Eddera Headbands

Camille Eddera started her line in 2008, but it was a year later when she began crafting her most famous pieces – 14K gold-filled headbands. It was at the bidding of a hairstylist who wanted to outfit his celeb clientele in her vintage-style creations. The French designer has worked forBoucheron and Chopard, so she certainly has an impressive Jewel Snob pedigree. One of her most popular headbands is the Greek Leaf version – Victoria Beckham sported it on her b-day (a crown for a queen!). This is the kind of dramatic jewelry you envision goddesses like Aphrodite to wear, and who doesn’t want to emulate that kind of grace and authority? The back is elastic, meaning they’re just as comfy as they are chic. For something a little more toned down, try the thinner Little Branch headband, or eschew laurels altogether with the Feather design! 

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Fragments Jewelry: Little Pieces of Heaven

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches


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Wilfredo Rosado Jewelry: Rustling Feathers

CATEGORIES:Jewelry & Watches

Wilfredo Rosado Jewelry

As a protégé of both Giorgio Armani and Andy Warhol, fine jewelry designer Wilfredo Rosado knows a thing or two about “transforming street style into high fashion.” Look no further than the Metropolis earrings below, a classic teardrop shape outfitted with a multitude of diamonds, rubies, and pink and yellow sapphires. What sets the pieces from this collection apart, though, is their construction. Rosado assembled the jewelry using a new technique called nano ceramic, which is a way of applying color that adheres to gold. Many of his jewels also involve interchangeable elements as with these fringe earrings. Each pair comes with three additional feather options created at the atelier Maison Lemarie in Paris. Hey, just because it’s fine jewelry doesn’t mean it can’t be fun! 

Wilfredo Rosado Jewelry

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